Since October is Adopt a Shelter Pet Month, we want to take a look at some of the ways you can help shelter pets without adopting them. Whether you already have multiple pets or simply aren’t in a position that allows you to take on the responsibility of bringing a pet into your home, the good news is there are still ways you can help. So if you love animals and want to know what you can do to support animals that are in need, here are five great options:

1. Drive

Over the last decade, several hundred thousand dogs have been driven from shelters around the United States to rescue organizations. This is especially common in rural southern areas. Since rescue organizations need drivers who can bring in these animals, volunteering to work as one can allow you to play a direct role in saving dogs’ lives.

2. Serve as a Foster Home

Although you may not be in a position to permanently take in a new pet, you may be able to do so on a temporary basis. If you are in this type of position, just about every rescue is in need of foster homes. You can easily learn more about this opportunity by looking up shelters around Cincinnati or West Chester and calling them.

3. Volunteer

Most shelters depend on volunteers to run their daily operations. Whether you only have a few free hours a week or a couple of free days, you can make a real difference by volunteering at a shelter. In terms of exactly what you’ll do, it will depend on the shelter. Common volunteer tasks include mailing applications, walking dogs, making phone calls for the shelter or helping with daily tasks like feeding or cleaning.

4. Donate

If you want to help the animals at a local shelter but simply don’t have any spare time in your schedule, you’re definitely not alone. Between professional and personal responsibilities, it’s easy to be booked up from morning until night. The good news is you can still help out by donating. In addition to simply donating money, if you have any kind of connection to a resource a shelter may need, it’s worth contacting one and finding out the best amount of that resource for you to donate.

5. Offer Specialized Skills

As small organizations trying to make a big impact, shelters may not have all of the specialized skills at their disposal that they would like. Whether you’re an expert in marketing, fundraising, design or any other skill, finding a shelter you resonate with and then helping in a specialized way can be a win-win for both parties.

Whether you drive, serve as a foster home, volunteer, donate or offer specialized skills, your involvement with a shelter can help save the lives of amazing animals. And since we’re talking about shelters when the holiday season is right around the corner, we encourage you to read & share our post from last year about why dogs don’t make good Christmas gifts.

 

Dogs don’t tend to tell their owners when they’re in pain. In fact, it’s much more common for dogs to try hiding any feelings of pain. Since you want to provide your dog with any care it may need, it’s important to pay close attention to your dog’s behavior and physical condition. One of the ways to do this is by monitoring your dog’s eyes. This element of your dog can provide a lot of information about its overall health. The reason is the eyes are directly connected to your dog’s neurologic systems, as well as its vascular ones.

While it may take a trained specialist to use an eye examination to identify the exact condition a dog has, this type of exam has the potential to reveal viral, bacterial and other systemic infections, as well as diabetes, hypertension and cancer. Although you don’t need to learn all the steps necessary to give your dog a comprehensive eye exam, knowing how to watch for changes and what some of those changes may mean can give you a useful tool for protecting your dog’s health.

Common Causes of Red Eye in Dogs

Most vets will tell you that redness is the most common reason related to the eyes that owners bring in their dogs. It’s possible that redness is just a sign of fatigue. Other possibilities include dry eye, uveitis, conjunctivitis, corneal ulceration or glaucoma. If you’re wondering how to tell the difference between a minor problem and something more serious, experts recommend checking your dog’s eyes in the morning. 

The whites of your dog’s eyes should look quite white with a few pink blood vessels in the morning. Being more bloodshot at the end of the day is normal, but increased redness of the white area may indicate ocular disease. If one eye looks redder than the other or if both eyes look redder than they did the day before, and you notice any other eye changes, definitely see a vet. And if you have any doubts, it’s always best to still have your dog checked out by a vet.

What’s Behind Haziness, Cloudiness, Squinting and/or Rubbing?

Haziness can be caused by an inflammation inside the eye or scratches on the cornea. Both conditions can be confirmed by a vet and then treated with medication. Cloudiness can be a sign of glaucoma, which may be treatable with medication or require surgery depending on its severity.

Squinting or rubbing are other things to watch for in your dog. If you notice either of these behaviors, it normally means something is causing ocular pain. Depending on the specific condition behind the pain, a vet will be able to treat it with anti-inflammatories, topical antibiotics or systemic pain management. - Dog Day Every Day 



Regardless of their size, your dog probably has no trouble acting tough when it feels the need to protect you. However, underneath that bravado is probably a total softie. And while your dog’s gentle nature is usually reflected in affection and other positive traits, there may be one issue that concerns you. The issue we’re talking about is storm anxiety. For owners of dogs with this condition, watching this type of anxiety take over can be very difficult.


In a matter of seconds, a dog can go from its normal happy self to being visibly anxious. Depending on the specific dog, actions that go along with this condition may include pacing, hiding in the closet, squeezing into a tight space like behind a toilet, clawing walls, chewing carpets or even trying to break through something like a window.


Before we cover any more information about this condition, it’s important to note two things. First, dog thunderstorm phobia is a very real condition in dogs and one that shouldn’t be ignored by owners. And second, a common misconception about this condition is that dogs grow out of it. In most cases, that’s simply not the case.


Tips for Helping a Dog Feel Better During a Storm


Although experts haven’t pinpointed the exact cause of this condition, most believe it’s the result of a combination of wind, thunder, lightning, barometric pressure changes, static electricity and low-frequency rumbles. That’s why a dog may begin showing signs of anxiety before you’re even able to hear that a storm is building.


With some dogs, this type of anxiety may be present from when they’re very young. And with others, it’s actually a condition that can develop later in life. While there’s no cure for storm anxiety, there are definitely ways to help manage it.


The first thing you can do is reward your dog’s calm behavior on a regular basis. By engaging in this type of training when it’s not stormy, you can create a habit which can be very useful when a storm does start brewing. The next way to help is to create a safe place where you dog can retreat during a storm. Common options include a basement corner, small room with calm music playing, open crate or even a bathroom. The best way to pick a spot is to watch where your dog naturally goes during a storm.


Another option is to put a snug garment on your dog. Studies have shown that snug-fitting shirts and wraps may be useful to calm anxious dogs. Finally, since dogs are more likely to have worse anxiety symptoms when they’re alone, bring your dog to our awesome daycare facilities on spring days when you can’t be at home and it’s likely to storm.

Going for a run outside always feels great. Even though there may be times during the run when you feel tired, the end result of a run will leave you feeling energized. Dogs feel the same way. Regardless of their size, they enjoy being able to burn off energy by running around and having fun.


While the fresh air is always nice, living in Cincinnati means the weather doesn’t always cooperate with plans to go for a run. Whether it’s too cold or all muddy outside due to rain, these conditions definitely aren’t ideal for enjoying a run.


What’s great about dog treadmills is even when the weather isn’t cooperating, it’s still possible for a dog to get plenty of exercise. Let’s take a look at the specific benefits that make this type of machine so great:


1. No More Excuses: Just as people do, dogs benefit from exercise consistency. Having a treadmill to use means that even when the weather is terrible, you won’t have an excuse for skipping a workout.


2. Minimizes Stress: Dog treadmills are designed to absorb shock, which makes them less stressful on dog’s joints than running on concrete or asphalt. This can be especially helpful for older dogs.


3. Controlled Speed: A treadmill eliminates the distractions that can occur outside and makes it possible for your dog to exercise at a consistent rate.


4. Really Fun: In addition to using a consistent speed, you can also add a fun twist by varying speeds. This gives your dog the ability to run in the way they want (which may not be possible when they’re outside on a leash).


Take Advantage of the Treadmill at Dog Day, Every Day


Although there are a lot of good things that can be said about dog treadmills, there are two notable drawbacks. The first drawback is their price. It’s difficult to find a reliable doggy treadmill for under $500. Unless you get lucky and find an amazing deal, you’re likely going to pay in the $500-$800 range for one. The other drawback is this device can take up quite a bit of space. While a dog treadmill is smaller than ones made for people, it may take up too much space in a place like an apartment.


If you’re concerned about either of those drawbacks, you’ll be happy to know that you can still take advantage of everything a dog treadmill has to offer without worrying about the downsides. The way you can make that happen is by bringing your dog to daycare at Dog Day, Every Day. In addition to our outdoor space, we also have a great dog treadmill!

Our rates start as low as $15 a day. And if you have any questions about our daycare program, don't hesitate to give us a call at 513-860-DOGS.

Your Guide to Dog Dental Health Month

Posted by Dawn Donaldson


February is officially here, which means that in addition to Valentine’s and Presidents’ Day, it’s also Pet Dental Health Awareness Month. While everyone knows that they should personally floss more often, it’s easy to forget just how important dental health is for dogs. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80% of dogs show signs of oral disease by the age of three.


Since everyone wants their beloved pets to be healthy and happy for as long as possible, dental health is something to take very seriously. Given that only 14% of dogs receive dental care at the vet’s office, it’s safe to say that there’s a lot of room for improvement. So with that goal in mind, Dog Day Every Day wants to cover some of the things you can do to help your dog maximize its dental health:


Understand the Signs of Dental Disease


Taking care of your dog starts by understanding the signs that there’s something which needs to be addressed. Bad breath, loose or discolored teeth, teeth covered in tartar, drooling, dropping food from the mouth or your dog not being comfortable with having its mouth touched are all potential signs of dental disease. Bleeding from the mouth, loss of appetite or loss of weight are often signs of more serious oral health problems.


Take Your Dog for a Dental Exam


Even if you haven’t noticed any of the signs covered above, it’s still a good idea to take your dog for an annual dental exam. Giving a vet an opportunity to look in your dog’s mouth will ensure that any potential issues are noticed so that they can be properly addressed.


Start Brushing and Chewing


While it’s important to have a medical professional check out your dog’s teeth, gums and mouth, you can make the biggest impact by committing to a consistent brushing schedule. If you have any questions about how often you should brush (once a week is the rule of thumb but can vary), what type of toothpaste to use or the best dental chews to give your dog, don’t hesitate to ask your vet for guidance.


Schedule Dental Cleanings


When you visit the dentist, they’re always able to clean your teeth despite the fact that you brush at least twice a day. The same is true for dogs. In addition to consistent brushing at home, it’s important to schedule dental cleanings on a regular basis so that your dog's mouth can be completely cleaned out and prevent any issues with tartar build-up.


By putting these dental health habits into practice for your dog during February and then continuing to make them a priority throughout 2016, you can ensure that your dog has the healthiest year possible!






In one of our last posts for 2015, we discussed why dogs should be adopted and not bought. While we’re very happy to see that more people than ever are turning towards adoption instead of purchasing when they’re ready to add a new member to their household, there’s another issue within adoption that we want to focus on.


When people decide to start the process of adopting a dog, they often focus their search on finding a puppy or very young dog. Although we fully support anyone who wants to provide a loving home to a puppy, we want to share a handful of reasons why people should at least consider adopting an older dog:


Less Accidents and Training


Many people underestimate just how much work and patience it can take to train a puppy. If your family already has a fairly busy schedule, giving a puppy the attention it needs to be properly trained may be a significant challenge. By adopting an older dog, you can make the transition to having a dog in your home with far fewer pieces of chewed up furniture.


Fulfillment Knowing You Saved a Life


At most shelters, older dogs are the first to be euthanized when a facility gets too full. By making the decision to adopt an older dog, you may be saving an animal’s life. That will ensure a strong bond between the two of you from the very start.


Can Still Teach Them New Tricks


Not only do older dogs generally know more commands than younger ones, but the old saying about not being able to teach an old dog new tricks is a myth. In fact, mature dogs have a longer attention span than puppies, which means that the training process is often easier.


Just As Receptive to Love


Another misconception about older dogs is that they’re not going to bond with an individual or family in the same way that puppies do. However, based on our experiences and those of people who bring their dogs to our daycare, that’s simply not true. It’s actually common for dogs who have had a harder life to recognize just how good they have it in a new setting and give all their love & loyalty in return.


Perfect for Many Different Types of Individuals and Families


Not everyone wants a hyper puppy running around their home. If you feel that you’re in a place in your life where you want a dog to join your household but may be looking for a more mature companion, we highly encourage you to spend time with some of the older dogs at a local adoption center.


Whether you ultimately end up adopting a puppy or an older dog, if you ever need a place for them to be cared for while you’re away from home, our dog daycare is the perfect option!