October is Adopt a Dog Month

Posted by Dawn Donaldson

                                                 

If you've been thinking about adopting a dog, October is the perfect opportunity to make this decision official. Not only will bringing a dog into your home this fall make the holiday season even more memorable, but October is actually Adopt a Dog Month. Since there are a lot of great things about adopting a dog, we want to use this post to highlight five of them:


1. Save a Life


The sad reality of pet overpopulation in the United States is that 2.7 million adoptable dogs and cats are euthanized every year. By making the decision to adopt a dog, you are giving that special animal the opportunity to live a full and happy life.


2. Start a Wonderful Journey


Having a pet is a very special experience. You'll be able to bond with your dog in all kinds of ways. Whether you live alone or have a family, the dog you adopt will become a central part of your daily life. From playing outside to hanging around the house, you'll be able to enjoy countless fun experiences with your pet.


3. Adoption is Affordable


Bringing a dog into your life is a financial commitment. However, it's a financial commitment that's completely manageable. And when you go the route of adopting, you won't have to worry about an overwhelming upfront cost. Shelters want dogs to find homes, which is why they work very hard to make this process a smooth transition for people adopting. Not only do shelters do a great job of keeping adopting costs down, but this fee typically includes spaying/neutering, first vaccinations and potentially even microchipping.


4. Lots of Benefits to Having a Dog


We mentioned above that bringing a dog home is an opportunity to save a life and the start of a wonderful journey. While you can give a dog a lot by adopting it, you'll also get so much from having a pet in your life. Studies have found that dogs provide numerous emotional and physical benefits to their owners. Whether it's having a reason to exercise more often or enjoying the stress-reducing effects that pets have, your dog will always be there for you.


5. Gift That Keeps Giving


When you adopt a dog from a shelter, you are freeing up valuable housing space that will allow the shelter to bring in another dog in need. Seeing the great experience you have after adopting may inspire others to do the same, which will continue the cycle of helping dogs that need it the most.


If you have any questions about local shelters or bringing your newly adopted dog to our daycare, don't hesitate to get in touch with us by calling 513-860-DOGS.

 

Dogs don’t tend to tell their owners when they’re in pain. In fact, it’s much more common for dogs to try hiding any feelings of pain. Since you want to provide your dog with any care it may need, it’s important to pay close attention to your dog’s behavior and physical condition. One of the ways to do this is by monitoring your dog’s eyes. This element of your dog can provide a lot of information about its overall health. The reason is the eyes are directly connected to your dog’s neurologic systems, as well as its vascular ones.

While it may take a trained specialist to use an eye examination to identify the exact condition a dog has, this type of exam has the potential to reveal viral, bacterial and other systemic infections, as well as diabetes, hypertension and cancer. Although you don’t need to learn all the steps necessary to give your dog a comprehensive eye exam, knowing how to watch for changes and what some of those changes may mean can give you a useful tool for protecting your dog’s health.

Common Causes of Red Eye in Dogs

Most vets will tell you that redness is the most common reason related to the eyes that owners bring in their dogs. It’s possible that redness is just a sign of fatigue. Other possibilities include dry eye, uveitis, conjunctivitis, corneal ulceration or glaucoma. If you’re wondering how to tell the difference between a minor problem and something more serious, experts recommend checking your dog’s eyes in the morning. 

The whites of your dog’s eyes should look quite white with a few pink blood vessels in the morning. Being more bloodshot at the end of the day is normal, but increased redness of the white area may indicate ocular disease. If one eye looks redder than the other or if both eyes look redder than they did the day before, and you notice any other eye changes, definitely see a vet. And if you have any doubts, it’s always best to still have your dog checked out by a vet.

What’s Behind Haziness, Cloudiness, Squinting and/or Rubbing?

Haziness can be caused by an inflammation inside the eye or scratches on the cornea. Both conditions can be confirmed by a vet and then treated with medication. Cloudiness can be a sign of glaucoma, which may be treatable with medication or require surgery depending on its severity.

Squinting or rubbing are other things to watch for in your dog. If you notice either of these behaviors, it normally means something is causing ocular pain. Depending on the specific condition behind the pain, a vet will be able to treat it with anti-inflammatories, topical antibiotics or systemic pain management. - Dog Day Every Day 

Your dog’s fur does a great job of keeping it warm during the winter. But when the temperature heats up, your dog’s coat isn’t very useful for helping to regulate heat. Instead, the way dogs get rid of heat is through a combination of panting and the glands in their footpads. While this works fine in normal conditions, dogs can only deal with so much heat.

If a dog gets too hot, it can cause their body to overheat. In a worst case situation, this results in a heat stroke. Since heat stroke can be a very serious condition, it’s important to understand how to recognize the signs and what to do if it happens. Just as importantly is knowing what you can do to prevent it from happening in the first place.

Signs and Causes of Heat Stroke

Excessive panting is an early sign that a dog is overheating. If this continues, a dog will begin to exhibit other signs of discomfort. It’s important to take stock of the surrounding temperature and decide if it seems too hot for a dog. The most common cause of this type of incident is a dog getting left in a car on a hot day. It can also happen if a dog is outside during the peak heat and is either too active or doesn’t have enough shade.

What to Do If Your Dog Has a Heat Stroke

Heat stroke can cause a dog to loses consciousness. If this happens, run cool water over your dog while preventing any water from going in its mouth. You can also apply an ice pack or bag of frozen vegetables to the dog’s head. You’ll want to massage your dog’s legs and then let your dog drink as much water as it wants upon waking. Putting a pinch of salt in the water can help your dog get lost minerals back. Then as soon as possible, get your dog to the vet so it can be checked for unseen problems like kidney issues, brain swelling or abnormal blood clotting.

How to Prevent Heat Stroke

The most important thing you can do is never leave your dog in your car during the summer. Even if it’s just a few minutes, temperatures can quickly spike to unsafe levels. It’s also important to avoid too much activity during the hottest hours of the day. And when you are outside with your dog, make sure there’s shade and fresh drinking water available.

If you can’t be with your dog during the day and want to ensure it’s in a safe environment with loving professionals who know how to prevent issues like heat stroke, be sure to take a look at our dog day care services for Cincinnati and the surrounding areas.

Your Guide to Dog Dental Health Month

Posted by Dawn Donaldson


February is officially here, which means that in addition to Valentine’s and Presidents’ Day, it’s also Pet Dental Health Awareness Month. While everyone knows that they should personally floss more often, it’s easy to forget just how important dental health is for dogs. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80% of dogs show signs of oral disease by the age of three.


Since everyone wants their beloved pets to be healthy and happy for as long as possible, dental health is something to take very seriously. Given that only 14% of dogs receive dental care at the vet’s office, it’s safe to say that there’s a lot of room for improvement. So with that goal in mind, Dog Day Every Day wants to cover some of the things you can do to help your dog maximize its dental health:


Understand the Signs of Dental Disease


Taking care of your dog starts by understanding the signs that there’s something which needs to be addressed. Bad breath, loose or discolored teeth, teeth covered in tartar, drooling, dropping food from the mouth or your dog not being comfortable with having its mouth touched are all potential signs of dental disease. Bleeding from the mouth, loss of appetite or loss of weight are often signs of more serious oral health problems.


Take Your Dog for a Dental Exam


Even if you haven’t noticed any of the signs covered above, it’s still a good idea to take your dog for an annual dental exam. Giving a vet an opportunity to look in your dog’s mouth will ensure that any potential issues are noticed so that they can be properly addressed.


Start Brushing and Chewing


While it’s important to have a medical professional check out your dog’s teeth, gums and mouth, you can make the biggest impact by committing to a consistent brushing schedule. If you have any questions about how often you should brush (once a week is the rule of thumb but can vary), what type of toothpaste to use or the best dental chews to give your dog, don’t hesitate to ask your vet for guidance.


Schedule Dental Cleanings


When you visit the dentist, they’re always able to clean your teeth despite the fact that you brush at least twice a day. The same is true for dogs. In addition to consistent brushing at home, it’s important to schedule dental cleanings on a regular basis so that your dog's mouth can be completely cleaned out and prevent any issues with tartar build-up.


By putting these dental health habits into practice for your dog during February and then continuing to make them a priority throughout 2016, you can ensure that your dog has the healthiest year possible!






In one of our last posts for 2015, we discussed why dogs should be adopted and not bought. While we’re very happy to see that more people than ever are turning towards adoption instead of purchasing when they’re ready to add a new member to their household, there’s another issue within adoption that we want to focus on.


When people decide to start the process of adopting a dog, they often focus their search on finding a puppy or very young dog. Although we fully support anyone who wants to provide a loving home to a puppy, we want to share a handful of reasons why people should at least consider adopting an older dog:


Less Accidents and Training


Many people underestimate just how much work and patience it can take to train a puppy. If your family already has a fairly busy schedule, giving a puppy the attention it needs to be properly trained may be a significant challenge. By adopting an older dog, you can make the transition to having a dog in your home with far fewer pieces of chewed up furniture.


Fulfillment Knowing You Saved a Life


At most shelters, older dogs are the first to be euthanized when a facility gets too full. By making the decision to adopt an older dog, you may be saving an animal’s life. That will ensure a strong bond between the two of you from the very start.


Can Still Teach Them New Tricks


Not only do older dogs generally know more commands than younger ones, but the old saying about not being able to teach an old dog new tricks is a myth. In fact, mature dogs have a longer attention span than puppies, which means that the training process is often easier.


Just As Receptive to Love


Another misconception about older dogs is that they’re not going to bond with an individual or family in the same way that puppies do. However, based on our experiences and those of people who bring their dogs to our daycare, that’s simply not true. It’s actually common for dogs who have had a harder life to recognize just how good they have it in a new setting and give all their love & loyalty in return.


Perfect for Many Different Types of Individuals and Families


Not everyone wants a hyper puppy running around their home. If you feel that you’re in a place in your life where you want a dog to join your household but may be looking for a more mature companion, we highly encourage you to spend time with some of the older dogs at a local adoption center.


Whether you ultimately end up adopting a puppy or an older dog, if you ever need a place for them to be cared for while you’re away from home, our dog daycare is the perfect option!