Dogs don’t tend to tell their owners when they’re in pain. In fact, it’s much more common for dogs to try hiding any feelings of pain. Since you want to provide your dog with any care it may need, it’s important to pay close attention to your dog’s behavior and physical condition. One of the ways to do this is by monitoring your dog’s eyes. This element of your dog can provide a lot of information about its overall health. The reason is the eyes are directly connected to your dog’s neurologic systems, as well as its vascular ones.

While it may take a trained specialist to use an eye examination to identify the exact condition a dog has, this type of exam has the potential to reveal viral, bacterial and other systemic infections, as well as diabetes, hypertension and cancer. Although you don’t need to learn all the steps necessary to give your dog a comprehensive eye exam, knowing how to watch for changes and what some of those changes may mean can give you a useful tool for protecting your dog’s health.

Common Causes of Red Eye in Dogs

Most vets will tell you that redness is the most common reason related to the eyes that owners bring in their dogs. It’s possible that redness is just a sign of fatigue. Other possibilities include dry eye, uveitis, conjunctivitis, corneal ulceration or glaucoma. If you’re wondering how to tell the difference between a minor problem and something more serious, experts recommend checking your dog’s eyes in the morning. 

The whites of your dog’s eyes should look quite white with a few pink blood vessels in the morning. Being more bloodshot at the end of the day is normal, but increased redness of the white area may indicate ocular disease. If one eye looks redder than the other or if both eyes look redder than they did the day before, and you notice any other eye changes, definitely see a vet. And if you have any doubts, it’s always best to still have your dog checked out by a vet.

What’s Behind Haziness, Cloudiness, Squinting and/or Rubbing?

Haziness can be caused by an inflammation inside the eye or scratches on the cornea. Both conditions can be confirmed by a vet and then treated with medication. Cloudiness can be a sign of glaucoma, which may be treatable with medication or require surgery depending on its severity.

Squinting or rubbing are other things to watch for in your dog. If you notice either of these behaviors, it normally means something is causing ocular pain. Depending on the specific condition behind the pain, a vet will be able to treat it with anti-inflammatories, topical antibiotics or systemic pain management. - Dog Day Every Day