Dog's Feet and Nails

This is the time of year everything begins to grow again! Your dog’s nails, however, have continued to grow all year long. In fact, they may have grown a bit longer over the winter if the weather prohibited or limited the number of dog walks the two of you were able to take. No worries though! The good news is that you can easily maintain your dogs’ nails – and paws – by following a few simple tips.

Inspecting your dog’s feet and nails 

Whether your dogs are mainly indoors or outdoors, their feet and nails can suffer some ill effects. Discomfort or pain from overgrown nails, broken or chipped nail tips, and scratches and cuts to their paws or toes are just some of the problems that could go unnoticed. Additionally, dogs can suffer frostbite in winter months and burns from hot pavement during the summer months. By regularly checking out your dogs’ feet for these and other problems, you’ll be able to quickly address them and keep Fido or Fifi healthy and happy.

Washing your dogs’ feet 

Keeping their feet clean is a good practice for a number of reasons, not the least of which is limiting the amount of dirt tracked into your home from outdoors! But also, keeping mud, rock salt, and other debris from collecting on or between dogs’ nails and toes will keep them from ingesting it (by licking their own feet) and eliminate any discomfort. A quick (but less effective) way to clean your pup’s feet is to use a dog wipe to wash and a paper towel to dry. The better way is to use a small bucket of warm water and dog shampoo, dip each foot, rinse and dry with a towel.

Grooming that includes nail trimming

Scheduling regular grooming by a professional dog groomer is the best way to ensure your pet not only looks her very best but also receives the attention she needs to details like nail trimming. While regularly walking your dogs helps to keep their nails worn down, trimming is necessary to make sure they don’t overgrow. Two problems can occur from overgrown nails: Possible pain and discomfort from long nails putting pressure on their toes, and the overgrowth of the “quick,” the blood vessel that supplies the nails with nutrients. When the quick overgrows, cutting nails can result in bleeding, injury or infection for your pet. Avoid these situations by having your dogs’ nails trimmed during monthly grooming.

Dog Day, Every Day's Pawdicures include not only nail trimming but the nails are also dremeled to a smooth finish, resulting in nails that are trimmed to the correct length without the jagged edges.

At Dog Day, Every Day! we believe in promoting a healthy lifestyle for our furry friends, which is why we work hard to create a positive, active environment that promotes their well-being. We provide a wide range of services that cater to each dog’s unique needs. So, enroll today or call us at 513-860-DOGS (3647).

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Shedding Some Light on Shedding

Posted by Dawn Donaldson

Shedding Some Light on Shedding

As the weather begins to turn warm and you and your dogs begin spending more time outdoors, you’re likely to notice that your furry best friend is beginning to shed. In fact, dogs shed more in the spring than at any other time of the year. Despite the mess that dog hair can cause your home, there are a few simple things you can do to help manage your pet’s shedding. As well, exploring some facts about why and when dogs shed may also prove to be useful in helping to understand the process and allowing you to better manage the amount of shedding that goes on in your home.

Why and When Dogs Shed

Shedding naturally occurs in most dogs as their body’s way of seasonally preparing their coat for the coming season. Because dogs don’t sweat the way that humans do, they need a lighter coat of hair in the summer months and a thicker coat in the winter season. That is why they tend to shed the most in spring for their lighter summer coat. Dogs also begin to shed again toward the end of summer – albeit less than in spring – to prepare for regrowth of a thicker coat for winter. Contrariwise, many breeds will shed gradually year-round. While it’s a natural process, it’s not very forgiving, especially when dog parents are trying to maintain a household that may include people with allergies to dog hair and dander.

What You Can Do

  • Choose Breeds Wisely - For those who are looking to adopt a new canine into their households, if shedding is a major concern for you, then you may consider choosing a breed that sheds little or not at all. A few breeds that offer little to no shedding include Poodles and Dachshunds, while Retrievers usually shed more throughout the year. 

  • Brush Them Often - Removing loose hair by brushing your dogs outdoors (if possible) will go a long way toward lessening the probability of pet hair and dander lingering around your household. As well, vacuuming dog beds and areas of the house where they spend the most time will help to relieve possible allergic reactions.

  • Bathe Them Regularly – Giving your dogs a bath regularly (no more than 2 to 3 times a month) is a great way to not only keep dog hair out of your home but also to give your pet-friends some needed attention plus keep them smelling fresh and looking healthy.

Let Dog Day help you keep shedding to a minimum in your home. Bathe and care for your dogs with the Dog Day full-service bath including a Shed-less Package. Our Shed-less Package combines our famous shed-less treatment along with 15 minutes of brushing using the patented FURminator tool, which can reduce shedding up to 90 percent.

At Dog Day, Every Day! we believe in promoting a healthy lifestyle for our furry friends, that’s why we work hard to create a positive, active environment that promotes their well-being. We provide a wide range of services that cater to each dog’s unique needs. So, enroll today or call us at 513-860-DOGS (3647).

Check us out on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest!